Install Theme

The Blanton Museum of Art is one of the foremost university art museums in the country and has the largest collection of art in Central Texas.

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Andy Freeberg

Guardians

In the art museums of Russia, women sit in the galleries and guard the collections. When you look at the paintings and sculptures, the presence of the women becomes an inherent part of viewing the artwork itself. I found the guards as intriguing to observe as the pieces they watch over. In conversation they told me how much they like being among Russia’s great art. A woman in Moscow’s State Tretyakov Gallery Museum said she often returns there on her day off to sit in front of a painting that reminds her of her childhood home. Another guard travels three hours each day to work, since at home she would just sit on her porch and complain about her illnesses, “as old women do.” She would rather be at the museum enjoying the people watching, surrounded by the history of her country.

1. Stroganov Palace, Russian State Museum

2.Matisse Still Life, Hermitage Museum

3.Konchalovsky’s Family Portrait, State Tretyakov Gallery

4. Veronese’s Adoration of the Shepherds, Hermitage Museum

5. Rublev and Daniil’s The Deesis Tier, State Tretyakov Gallery

6. Michelangelo’s Moses and the Dying Slave, Pushkin Museum

7.Malevich’s Self Portrait, Russian State Museum

8. Nesterov’s Blessed St Sergius of Radonezh, Russian State Museum

9. Petrov-Vodkin’s Bathing of a Red Horse, State Tretyakov Gallery

10. Kugach’s Before the Dance, State Tretyakov Gallery

(via post-impressionisms)

philamuseum:

More Art Monday: Ghosts in the Museum

Ghost,” 1964, by Alexander Calder (© Estate of Alexander Calder / Artists Rights Society [ARS], New York)

Ghost,” c. 1952–1953, by Caroline Durieux

The Albatross,” 1965–1968, by Benton Murdoch Spruance

The Witch of Endor Conjuring up the Ghost of Samuel,” before 1816, by Heinrich Guttenberg

A Ghost Jizō Startles a Near-Sighted Old Man at Asajigahara, from the series Comic Pictures of Famous Places Amid the Civilization of Tōkyō (Tōkyō kaika kyōga meisho),” by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi

“‘Louis Ghost’ Armchair,” designed 2002, designed by 
Philippe Starck, made by Kartell S.p.A

Banquet Scene from the Tale of Nastagio degli Onesti, in Boccaccio’s ‘Decameron,’” late 15th century, by David Ghirlandaio

More Art Monday is brought to you by Art 24/7.

good:

Kehinde Wiley, Venus at Paphos (The World Stage: Haiti), 2014. Oil on linen 60 x 48 in (152.5 x 122 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Culver City, California.

good:

Kehinde Wiley, Venus at Paphos (The World Stage: Haiti), 2014. Oil on linen 60 x 48 in (152.5 x 122 cm). Courtesy of the artist and Roberts & Tilton, Culver City, California.

(via generic-art)

Alan Saret, Autumn Cumulus, 1980, 48 in. x 40 in. x 36 in., lacquered wire, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 2004.
Much of the beauty of Saret’s sculptures derives from his sensitivity to the physical properties of the materials he uses. In the case of Autumn Cumulus, he wove together individual strands of copper wire to create a tangled web that abounds with organic associations. Responsive to minute changes in the environment, this loose, open network of wires gives a sense of volume but not mass, while simultaneously delineating the space around it in much the same way a drawing articulates space on a piece of paper. 

Alan SaretAutumn Cumulus, 1980, 48 in. x 40 in. x 36 in., lacquered wire, Archer M. Huntington Museum Fund, 2004.

Much of the beauty of Saret’s sculptures derives from his sensitivity to the physical properties of the materials he uses. In the case of Autumn Cumulus, he wove together individual strands of copper wire to create a tangled web that abounds with organic associations. Responsive to minute changes in the environment, this loose, open network of wires gives a sense of volume but not mass, while simultaneously delineating the space around it in much the same way a drawing articulates space on a piece of paper. 

thegetty:

Tapestries and oil sketches by Peter Paul Rubens, made nearly 400 years ago to celebrate the glory of the Roman Catholic Church, have arrived. Each tapestry weighs 150 to 200 pounds and was hoisted into place with 100 yards of pulley rope.

More behind the scenes + video »

The Meeting of Abraham and Melchizedek, 1626–33, woven by Jan Raes I, Hans Vervoert, and Jacob Fobert after designs by Peter Paul Rubens. Wool and silk, 192 15/16 x 236 1/4 in. Patrimonio Nacional, Monasterio de las Descalzas Reales, Madrid. Tapestry Copyright © PATRIMONIO NACIONAL