Install Theme

The Blanton Museum of Art is one of the foremost university art museums in the country and has the largest collection of art in Central Texas.

Carl Robert Holty, Red Desert, 1955-56, oil on canvas, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1968.
Working in Paris and New York immediately before World War II, American-born Holty painted in a variety of abstract styles: his work at this time was associated with cubism, biomorphism, and Abstraction-Création. Upon his return to the U.S., he became a founding member of American Abstract Artists, a group that sought to develop an American abstraction that differed from both European abstraction and the then-popular style of American regionalism. Red Desert, the painting included here, comes from later in his career, when the artist was exploring a more organic abstraction in which amorphous planes of color interact and overlap to create washy fields reminiscent of light as it plays off the land.

Carl Robert Holty, Red Desert, 1955-56, oil on canvas, Gift of Mari and James A. Michener, 1968.

Working in Paris and New York immediately before World War II, American-born Holty painted in a variety of abstract styles: his work at this time was associated with cubism, biomorphism, and Abstraction-Création. Upon his return to the U.S., he became a founding member of American Abstract Artists, a group that sought to develop an American abstraction that differed from both European abstraction and the then-popular style of American regionalism. Red Desert, the painting included here, comes from later in his career, when the artist was exploring a more organic abstraction in which amorphous planes of color interact and overlap to create washy fields reminiscent of light as it plays off the land.

We’ve grown so used to assuming that technology of this kind should make things crisper, cleaner, and more efficient that it’s a pleasure, a relief, even, to find an experience that is all but effortless in actual life instead slowed down and warped, complicated by the digital realm.

Alexandra Schwartz on Google’s initiative to take us on virtual trips through museums. (via newyorker)

(Source: newyorker.com, via newyorker)

hifructosemag:

You no longer have to be a scientist to understand the catastrophic impact of pollution its friend global warming. In California, we’re facing the greatest drought in recorded history; marine animals are choking on our collective waste amid mass plastic contamination in the ocean; in China last year, 16,000 pig carcasses were spotted floating down Huangpu River. Chinese-born, New York-based artist Cai GuoQiang reacts to global environmental catastrophes with his monumental exhibition, “The Ninth Wave,” currently on view atPower Station of Art, China’s first publicly-funded contemporary art museum in Shanghai. An interdisciplinary show filled with large-scale installations, ceramic works, drawings and even performance, “The Ninth Wave” examines the harrowing after-effects of rampant industrialization with finesse. Read more on Hi-Fructose.